AXA division apologizes behind Tesla crash test controversy

Every year, as part of AXA Switzerland’s accident investigation and prevention work, the company conducts a crash test to measure accidents in a safe environment. In 2020, the focus was on sports utility vehicles; 2021, recreational vehicles or camper vans; and 2022, electromobility. Featuring pyrotechnics, the latest event was designed to show that damage to the bottom of an EV can also lead to battery damage and a fire.

“Our aim with this year’s crash test was to draw attention to our figures and – at the same time – to raise public awareness of the potential dangers of battery-powered vehicles,” explains AXA Switzerland, which said. Fire being an illusion was clearly spoken about in the event.

“Unfortunately, we realized that tests and similar communication methods can be misleading, especially for those who have not been involved in the risk assessment and therefore have not been able to put it in the right place, because they are not involved in the risk. Comment associated with it.”

Read more: Shocking that AXA Insurance admits to burning for a fake Tesla battery

According to AXA Switzerland, no battery cells were used in Tesla’s test car, in line with the safety of the spectators in simulating accidents when a car powered by a battery catches fire. Extinguished under controlled conditions, the fire was designed to demonstrate the “extreme complexity” of an EV fire.

The insurer also admitted that: “The crash test with the Tesla car did not reveal the type of damage to the undercarriage that could ignite the battery fire as the pictures can show. The test that was carried out did not confirm the hypothesis of the accident.

“We should have mentioned this in our communications after the test, such as in our press release and the corresponding images that were provided. In retrospect, the test used to show the risk scenario should have been designed differently.”

Statistics from AXA Switzerland show that EVs catch fire less often than cars do. Although this was made clear in the August release, the company said it is now forced to admit that, in the absence of anything, the same image appears to show otherwise.

“We regret the confusion this caused and would like to sincerely apologize,” AXA Switzerland said. “We will analyze the 2022 crash tests in detail, learn what we can learn from them, and use this information in our future work to help improve road safety.”

AXA Switzerland is ruining the day it presented a crash test – with the aim of showing the danger of battery fires in electric vehicles (EVs) – using a Tesla without battery cells.

In its statement, the insurance company said: “Based on the results of the accident test that took place on August 25, 2022, AXA Switzerland wants to clarify its position … causing confusion regarding electromobility.”

Every year, as part of AXA Switzerland’s accident investigation and prevention work, the company conducts a crash test to measure accidents in a safe environment. In 2020, the focus was on sports utility vehicles; 2021, recreational vehicles or camper vans; and 2022, electromobility. Featuring pyrotechnics, the latest event was designed to show that damage to the bottom of an EV can also lead to battery damage and a fire.

“Our aim with this year’s crash test was to draw attention to our figures and – at the same time – to raise public awareness of the potential dangers of battery-powered vehicles,” explains AXA Switzerland, which said. Fire being an illusion was clearly spoken about in the event.

“Unfortunately, we realized that tests and similar communication methods can be misleading, especially for those who have not been involved in the risk assessment and therefore have not been able to put it in the right place, because they are not involved in the risk. Comment associated with it.”

Read more: Shocking that AXA Insurance admits to burning for a fake Tesla battery

According to AXA Switzerland, no battery cells were used in Tesla’s test car, in line with the safety of the spectators in simulating accidents when a car powered by a battery catches fire. Extinguished under controlled conditions, the fire was designed to demonstrate the “extreme complexity” of an EV fire.

The insurer also admitted that: “The crash test with the Tesla car did not reveal the type of damage to the undercarriage that could ignite the battery fire as the pictures can show. The test that was carried out did not confirm the hypothesis of the accident.

“We should have mentioned this in our communications after the test, such as in our press release and the corresponding images that were provided. In retrospect, the test used to show the risk scenario should have been designed differently.”

Statistics from AXA Switzerland show that EVs catch fire less often than cars do. Although this was made clear in the August release, the company said it is now forced to admit that, in the absence of anything, the same image appears to show otherwise.

“We regret the confusion this caused and would like to sincerely apologize,” AXA Switzerland said. “We will analyze the 2022 crash tests in detail, learn what we can learn from them, and use this information in our future work to help improve road safety.”