New Report Emphasizes Importance of Health Insurance and Cancer’s Role in Diagnosis and Survival: American Cancer Society

2022 JUL 26 (NewsRx) — By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Education Daily Report — ATLANTA– A new report led by researchers at American Cancer Society (ACS) shows that people without health insurance are more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage cancer and have a worse survival after cancer diagnosis than those with health insurance. The study also showed that for six cancers—prostate, colorectal, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, oral cavity, liver, and esophagus—uninsured people diagnosed with Stage I disease had a longer survival rate than people with health insurance who were diagnosed with Stage I disease. Stage II. The results were published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. “Our findings extend previous research showing that lack of health insurance is associated with a longer diagnosis and shorter survival among those newly diagnosed with cancer, with more recent and shorter survival,” he said. Jingxuan Zhaochief scientist of the organization American Cancer Society is the lead author of this study. “Improving access to comprehensive health insurance coverage is critical to ensuring access to care throughout the cancer treatment process, including receiving valid cancer screening, early diagnosis, and treatment.” The researchers used data from US The National Cancer Database (NCDB), a global clinical cancer registry supported by the ACS and a American College of Surgeons. The NCDB includes approximately 70% of newly diagnosed cancer patients US from over 1500 authorized sites and American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer. The NCDB contains patient information on demographics, tumor characteristics, health insurance, and vital signs. The authors of the study included people aged 18-64, who were newly diagnosed with cancer between 2010 and 2013, with any of the 19 cancers that tend to destroy.

The analysis showed that people without health insurance were more likely to be diagnosed with cancer later than people with health insurance. Also, people without health insurance are more likely to have short and long-term survival after a cancer diagnosis than people with health insurance.

Compared to people with private insurance who were diagnosed with Stage II cancer, uninsured people who were diagnosed with Stage I cancer had a higher risk of 6 cancer sites – prostate, colorectal, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, oral cavity, liver, and esophagus. In multivariate analyses, people without health insurance had worse quality of life than their privately insured counterparts for each of the 19 cancers combined and for 14 of the 19 cancer sites.

“Our research adds to the growing body of evidence that access to adequate health insurance coverage is critical to cancer treatment and outcomes,” says Dr. William Dahutchief of science at American Cancer Society. “People don’t have to get sick more or get sick later because they can’t afford treatment.”

Dr. Robin Yabroff is the lead author of this study. Other ACS authors include: Dr. Xuesong HanDr. Leticia Nogueiraand Dr. Ahmed Jemal.

Materials from American Cancer Society Information about health insurance coverage can be found here.

Direct link: Keywords for this article are: American Cancer SocietyCancer, Diagnostics and Screening, Health InsuranceHealth and Medicine, Oncology.

(Our reports provide news about research and findings from around the world.)